Quail 

 

Want to learn how to raise quail? Here is my blog on how to do it:
How to Raise Quail

Fresh Quail Eggs Benefits

 Quail eggs are small speckled eggs. and are considered a delicacy and has been prized as a dietary and healing food.   Practically no carbs, no bad cholesterol! The perfect little bite in  hors d'ooeuvres - miniature hard-boiled quail eggs are a fun one-bite cocktail party snack
An air of exotic elegance added to your meal.
  

We like to keep a bunch hard-boiled - throw them into salads, or a quick snack.
Poach, hard-boil, pickle, add to baking...You can treat a quail egg just like a chicken egg. About 4 - 5 eggs = a chicken egg.


Our eggs are larger because we are raising Japanese Cotournix quail, which are the larger quail. 

Health Benefits of Quail Eggs

Quail Eggs nutritional value is 3-4 times higher than that of chicken eggs. They contain 13% proteins while chicken eggs provide a bit more than 11%.  Quail eggs provide five times as much iron and potassium as chicken eggs. They also are richer in phosphorus and calcium.  Quail eggs do not have “bad” cholesterol (LDL) and are very rich in “good” (HDL) cholesterol.  

 
There are many health benefits of Quail eggs. Here is a quick look at those benefits: 
~ kid friendly: bite-sized quail eggs  are ideal for controlling infections and inflammations leading to asthma, allergies, eczema and psoriasis. 
~ remedy against digestive tract disorders such as gastritis, stomach ulcer and duodenal ulcer. 
~ can help cure anemia increasing hemoglobin level and remove toxins and heavy metals from blood.
~ can help in the treatment of tuberculosis, bronchial asthma, diabetes and vegetative-vascular dystonia.
~ have strong anticancer effects and may help inhibit cancerous growth.
~ help eliminate and remove stones from liver, kidneys and gallbladder.
~ may accelerate recuperation after blood stroke and help strengthen heart muscle.
powerful stimulant of sexual potency. They nourish the prostrate gland with useful substances, phosphorus, proteins and vitamins and therefore help restore sexual potency in men.
promote good memory, enhance brain activity and regulate the nervous system.
~ also strengthen the immune system slow down aging of organs and increase the life span; improve skin color and strengthen hair making it shiny and voluminous. That’s why quail eggs are used for facial and hair care masks.

 Resource for this article can be found at http://geniuscook.com/quail-eggs/

Quail Meat ~ the Food of Kings

Our farm-raised quail are never subjected to the rigors associated with a life in the wild. They are assured a daily ration of food and water free of harassment from predators, hormone and antibiotic free. This insures that the birds mature steadily and naturally resulting in very tender and deliciously delicate meat. 


Quail are very small birds making it the perfect serving size.   Quail has more protein than a single serving of chicken (13-grams), and the low fat content means a single serving of quail has a mere 69-calories.


Quail is not as mild and white as chicken meat, but not as dark and musky as, say, squab. The meat is reddish with a delicate texture, and is quite lean. Whole quails are often wrapped in bacon before roasting to maintain moisture.


When it comes to composition, quail meat is quite similar to broiler meat. It has a high protein content and a relatively low fat content. It has a higher content of the good polyunsaturated fatty acids. It is a significant source of phosphorus, iron and copper, while providing reasonable amounts of zinc and selenium.  it is high niacin (vitamin B3) and pyridoxine (vitamin B6) content. .

Quail has been eaten through out history.  
Here are some of the recipes I have found in my own recipe books.

Roast Virginia Quail, with Grape Sauce and Peach Garnish
From “The Williamsburg Cookbook”
pg. 61

4 quail                                                        1/4 cup dry sherry
salt and pepper                                           1 cup chicken stock
6 tablespoons butter, divided                   1  1/2 teaspoons cornstarch
36 white seedless grapes, divided            1 teaspoon lemon rind, grated
4 shallots, finely chopped                           2 teaspoons lemon juice
2 tablespoons cognac                                  4 peach halves, canned
1 tablespoon vegetable oil                           guava jelly

Quail on Toast
From the cookbook “Indian Cookin'”
pg. 39

6 quails

1 tablespoon butter              1 tablespoon water               Juice from 1 lemon

6 slices homemade bread, toasted

Lemon sliced                        parsley                                  6 slices bacon-wrapped

Pick, singe, clean and wipe the quails. Butter the inside of each quail and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Rub the butter lightly on the outside and wrap a thin slice of bacon around each bird. Melt the butter in the roasting pan. Add birds, cook in oven 20 – 30 minutes. Place the birds on hot buttered toast. Add to gravy a little butter, a tablespoon o water and the lemon juice. Strain and pour over the breast of the birds. Garnish with parsley and lemon

Lemon Baked Quail
Oxmoor House January 1985

This is my favorite recipe


16 quail, dressed

1/2 cup water

3/4 cup lemon juice

1/2 cup Worcestershire sauce

1/2 cup olive oil

1/4 cup butter or margarine

1 clove garlic, crushed

1 sprig fresh mint, chopped

Preparation

Place quail in a shallow roasting pan; add water. Cover and bake at 300° for 30 minutes.


Combine remaining ingredients in a medium saucepan; cook over low heat, stirring constantly, until mixture comes to a boil. Pour mixture over quail. Cover and bake an additional hour or until quail is tender, basting often.


Remove cover from roasting pan. Broil quail 4 inches from heating element 3 minutes or until lightly browned.

Yield: 8 servings

Quail Soup

  • Serves: 12

This soup is a variation of the consomme, but with quail, having the distinct and flavorful quail aroma. Ingredients
  • 4 quails 

  • 4 carrots, cut into chunks

  • 1 onion

  • 2 garlic cloves

  • 1 celery stick sliced

  • parsnip 1 root  cut into chunks

  • 3.5 ounces brussel sprouts

Instructions

Clean quail and cut into serving pieces. put in the soup pot, simmer  slowly until the meat is almost done.
Add vegetables. Boil them slowly together until is done. Put salt, pepper to taste. Pour the soup through calender in other pot.

Serve it with homemade pasta,